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This gel grows and heals by gobbling carbon from the air

Researchers at MIT have developed a material that sucks up carbon dioxide in the air to get stronger and repair itself when damaged. The process is similar to the way plants soak up carbon dioxide to grow living tissue.
This gel grows and heals by gobbling carbon from the air

The missing turtles of the Anthropocene

When one thinks of Anthropocene signifiers, it’s usually material novelties that come to mind: concrete, plastic, radioactive debris, etc. But the Age can also be marked by what is missing. Such as: turtles.
The missing turtles of the Anthropocene
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Anthropocene magazine wins global award from The Council for Advancement and Support of Education

Anthropocene won the 2018 bronze medal for specialty magazines alongside gold and silver winners, University of Toronto School of Medicine and University of California, San Francisco Medical campus. More here.

Benign by Design

IDEA WATCH Benign by Design The search for biodegradable drugs . By Anthony King When Israeli scientists tested vegetables for the epilepsy drug carbamazepine, they detected it in cucumbers, carrots, lettuce, and peppers. More surprisingly, people who ate the...

Benign by Design

The Resurgence of Solar Agriculture

Can farmers get the same food production under solar panels that they currently do growing lettuce for your dinner table the old-fashioned way—directly under the sun? There’s an increasing body of research suggesting that they can.
The Resurgence of Solar Agriculture
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Funding is provided by the National Science Foundation along with a worldwide network of supporting members. Anthropocene editorial offices are based at the U.S. Future Earth Hub at University of Colorado, Boulder and Colorado State University.